Friday, July 21, 2017

Our House in Holden ~ Photo Friday

These images are from my grandmother's slide collection.  They were given to be my a first cousin,  and were digitized by another cousin's son for me.  Thanks, Lani and Rob!



My grandfather must have taken these images when my grandparents came to visit us at our new house in Holden, Massachusetts.  We lived at 4 Scenic Drive, and moved there in January 1968.  It looks like this was that following fall, because the leaves of the trees are starting to turn colors.

In the top photo it looks like my sister was waiting on the front steps for me to come home from school.  I was in second grade, and she was about four years old. If you look closely you can see my grandmother, Bertha, peeking through the screen door!

The second photo shows our house from the side.  It was a very small ranch house.  You can barely see me sitting on the front steps.

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Our House in Holden ~ Photo Friday", Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 21, 2017, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/07/our-house-in-holden-photo-friday.html: accessed [access date]).

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Weathervane Wednesday ~ The first time I've seen THIS animal on a weathervane!

Weathervane Wednesday is an on-going series of photographs I post weekly.  I started out by publishing only weather vanes from the Londonderry area, but now I've been finding interesting weather vanes from all over New England.  Sometimes these weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are very unique.  Often, my readers tip me off to some very special and unusual weather vanes.

Today's weather vane is from somewhere in New Hampshire.

Do you know the location of weather vane #320?  Scroll down to see the answer...




This unique alpaca weathervane can be seen atop the Someday Farm's barn in Canterbury, New Hampshire. We were here during the May 2017 New Hampshire Open Doors tour, when businesses and artisans all over the Granite State hold open houses for touring and shopping.  There are NH Open Doors tours every fall and spring. 

It was fun to tour this alpaca farm, to see the newborn alpacas and to feel the super soft yarns and knitted items made from this yarn.  The owner of the farm said she remembered the day her custom weathervane and cupola were raised by crane over her new barn.  I told her I had never seen an alpaca weathervane.  Have you?   



Some Day Alpaca Farm website http://www.somedayfarm.com/

New Hampshire Open Doors https://nhopendoors.com/


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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ The first time I've seen THIS animal on a weathervane!", Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 19, 2017, (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/07/weathervane-wednesday-first-time-ive.html: accessed [access date]).

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Anna (Long) Converse, buried 1691 in Woburn, Massachusetts

This tombstone was photographed at the Old Burial Ground (First Burial Ground) in Woburn, Massachusetts.



HERE LYES Ye BODY OF
ANN CONVERS WIFE
TO JAMES CONVERS
AGED 69 YEARS
DIED AUGUST THE
10 1691

Anna (Long) Converse was my 8th great grandmother. She was born 1 June 1623 in St. Albans, England, and died 10 August 1691 in Woburn, Massachusetts. She was the first wife of Lt. James Converse, son of Deacon Edward Converse and Sarah Parker. Anna and James were married on 24 October 1643 in Woburn. 

Anna was the daughter of Robert Long and Sarah Taylor of Charlestown, Massachusetts.  They came to New England aboard the ship Defence on 7 July 1635.  Robert Long operated an inn in Bedfordshire, and owned the famous “Three Cranes” in Charlestown.  This inn stayed in the Long family for 100 years, and burned on 17 June 1777 when Charlestown was set on fire by the British when they evacuated Boston.

You can read more about “The Three Cranes” inn of Charlestown, Massachusetts, where Anna grew up, in this blog post:

My LONG lineage:

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “Tombstone Tuesday ~ Anna (Long) Converse, buried 1691 in Woburn, Massachusetts”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 18, 2017, (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/07/tombstone-tuesday-anna-long-converse.html: accessed [access date]). 

Saturday, July 15, 2017

Surname Saturday ~ WARD of Hingham and Charlestown, Massachusetts


WARD

Samuel Ward, my 10th great grandfather, was an early settler at Hingham, Massachusetts.  He might have been the brother of the Henry Ward who was buried there on 15 May 1642.  His first wife was Mary Hilliard, who died at Hingham 28 November 1638 ten days after giving birth to my 9th great grandfather, Samuel, Jr.  Mary had given four children to Samuel, Sr.  His second wife was Frances Pitcher, the widow of a Mr. Reycroft.  Frances died in 1690 and is buried at Copp’s Hill Burial Ground in Boston.

Samuel first owned land in Hingham that is now part of the town of Hull, Massachusetts. He removed to Charlestown where he owned a lot of land and was known as “Mr.”  He died on 31 August 1682 in Charlestown, and his will mentions his wife, Frances, his son Samuel (and Samuel’s children), son-in-law Isaac Lobdell, and also his daughter Mary and her husband Ambrose Gale (brother of my 8th great grandfather Edmund Gale (1640- 1716) of Beverly, Massachusetts).  He left an island between Hingham and Hull to Harvard College  [Middlesex County Probate, File #23742].  Samuel was buried at the Phipps Street Burial Ground in Charlestown.

His son, Samuel Ward, Jr., my 9th great grandfather, died in the battle against Quebec in 1690 serving under Sir William Phips.  He married very well, first to my 9th great grandmother, Abigail Maverick, the daughter of Moses Maverick and Mayflower passenger Remember Allerton.  His second wife was Sarah Bradstreet, widow of Richard Hubbard, and daughter of Governor Simon Bradstreet and the poet Anne Dudley (she was the daughter of Governor Thomas Dudley).   Their daughter, Martha Ward, my 8th great grandmother, married John Tuthill of Ipswich in 1689. 

Some WARD resources:

Ethel Farrington Smith, “Seventeenth Century Hull, Massachusetts, and her People”, New England Historic Genealogical Society Register, Volume 143, October 1989, pages 346 – 349.

Early Families of Hull, Massachusetts, by Ethel Farrington Smith, 2007, pages 197 – 199.

The Genealogies and Estates of Charlestown, Massachusetts, by Thomas Bellows Wyman, Volume 2, pages 993 – 994.

My WARD genealogy:

Generation 1: Samuel Ward, born about 1605 in England, died 31 August 1682 in Charlestown, Massachusetts; married first to Mary Hilliard. She died on 28 November 1638 in Hingham, Massachusetts.  He married second to Frances Pitcher, widow of Mr. Reycroft.

Generation 2: Samuel Ward, son of Samuel Ward and Mary Hilliard, baptized 18 November 1638 in Hingham, died between 30 July 1689 and 12 March 1691 during the Expedition to Quebec, Canada under Sir William Phips;  he married first to Abigail Maverick, daughter of Moses Maverick and Remember Allerton (they had seven children).  She was baptized 12 January 1645 in Salem and died before January 1686.  He married second to Sarah Bradstreet, widow of Richard Hubbard, and daughter of Simon Bradstreet and Anne Dudley.

Generation 3:  Martha Ward, born 16 September 1672 in Salem, died 17 August 1723 in Ipswich; married first on 3 December 1689 in Ipswich to John Tuthill, son of Simon Tuthill and Sarah Cogswell.  He was born 22 April 1666 in Ipswich, and died 27 February 1715 in Ipswich.  They had eleven children.  She married second to George Hart on 10 November 1722 in Ipswich.

Generation 4:  Martha Tuthill m. Mark Haskell
Generation 5:  Lucy Haskell m. Jabez Treadwell
Generation 6:  Nathaniel Treadwell m. Mary Hovey
Generation 7:  Jabez Treadwell m. Betsey  Jillings Homan
Generation 8:  Eliza Ann Treadwell m. Abijah Hitchings
Generation 9:  Abijah Franklin Hitchings m. Hannah Eliza Lewis
Generation 10:  Arthur Treadwell Hitchings m. Florence Etta Hoogerzeil
Generation 11: Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen (my grandparents)

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “Surname Saturday ~ WARD of Hingham and Charlestown, Massachusetts”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 15, 2017, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/07/surname-saturday-ward-of-hingham-and.html: accessed [access date]). 

Friday, July 14, 2017

Hula Hoop ~ Photo Friday

These images are from my grandmother's slide collection.  They were given to be my a first cousin,  and were digitized by my another cousin's son for me.  Thanks, Lani and Rob!




These photos must date from about 1968, based on my sister being about four years old in these photos.  It looks like we are in a relative's back yard, but after questioning a few family members we can't identify the property. My sister and Dad must have been trying out a hula hoop for the first time. I wonder if I tried it, too?

I love the blurred "action shot" of these images. The car in the background sets the time period in the 1960s. And the clothes line!  And my sister's little mini skirt, too.

My grandfather must have taken these photos.  I had never seen them before I received these digitized images.

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Hula Hoop ~ Photo Friday", Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 14, 2017, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/07/hula-hoop-photo-friday.html: accessed [access date]).

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Weathervane Wednesday ~ Another Ancestral Church

Weathervane Wednesday is an on-going series of photographs I post weekly.  I started out by publishing only weather vanes from the Londonderry area, but now I've been finding interesting weather vanes from all over New England.  Sometimes these weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are very unique.  Often, my readers tip me off to some very special and unusual weather vanes.

Today's weather vane is from somewhere in New Hampshire.

Do you know the location of weather vane #319?  Scroll down to see the answer...






This is the First Congregational Church of Hampton, New Hampshire.  It was founded by the Reverend Stephen Bachiler in 1638.  He was my 11th great grandfather, who not only founded the town, but he was also the father of ten children so he left a lot of descendants in New Hampshire!  There have been six different meeting house buildings here over the years, and today's pastor, the Rev. Deborah Knowlton,  is the 40th minister of this congregation.  She invited me and other descendants of the Batchelder and other founding families to the 375th anniversary a few years ago. You can read about that church service HERE.

The scrollwork arrow weathervane is typical of many seen atop New England churches.  Next to the banner style of weathervane, it is the most commonly seen.  This kind of weathervane became popular in the early and mid 1800s when they were mass produced by machines in factories in Waltham, Massachusetts.  The factory made arrows and banners were exceptionally fancy compared to the more simple ones made by hand.


A blog post about the Hampton Congregational Church:
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2013/09/375th-anniversary-of-first.html

A blog post about my BATCHELDER genealogy:
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2015/10/surname-saturday-batchelder-of-hampton.html  

The First Congregational Church, Hampton, website:
http://www.fcchampton.org/



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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ Another Ancestral Church", Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 12, 2017, (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/07/weathervane-wednesday-another-ancestral.html: accessed [access date]).

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Patience Converse, buried 1707 in Woburn, Massachusetts

This tombstone was photographed at the Old Burial Ground in Woburn, Massachusetts


  MEMENTO                      FUGIT
  MORI                                HORA

HERE LYES Ye BODY
OF PASHENCE CONVER
DAUGHTER OF MAJOR
JAMES & HANNAH CONVER
WHO DEPARTED THIS
LIFE JULY Ye 25th
1707  IN Ye 21
YEAR OF HER AGE.


Patience Converse, my 6th great aunt,  was born on 6 November 1686 in Woburn, and died unmarried 23 July 1707.  She was the daughter of Major James Converse (1645 – 1706) and Hannah Carter (1651 – 1691).  She came from a family of nine siblings, and I descend from her brother, Robert Converse (1677 – 1736) who married Mary Sawyer.  

My CONVERSE lineage:
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2016/09/surname-saturday-converse-of-woburn.html   


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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~ Patience Converse, buried 1707 in Woburn, Massachusetts", Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 11, 2017, (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/06/tombstone-tuesday-patience-converse.html: accessed [access date]). 

Saturday, July 8, 2017

Surname Saturday ~ TYBOTT of Gloucester, Massachusetts


TYBOTT, TIBOTT, TIBBETT

Walter Tybott (1584 – 1651), my 10th great grandfather, was from Wales. He was a member of Rev. Richard Blynman’s congregation.  This group of Puritans followed Rev. Blynman to New England about 1640 when he was forced from his church in Chepstow, Monmouthshire for his Puritan preaching.  It is thought that “The Blynman Party” (also known as “The Welsh Party”) was recruited by Gov. John Winslow.  They arrived in Plymouth, settled in Marshfield, and then Gloucester, Massachusetts in 1641.  Some went on to New London, Connecticut ten years later.  Apparently Walter Tybott and his family remained in Gloucester.

The Plymouth Colony records indicate that on 2 March 1640/41 Walter Tibbott, and others were nominated to become Freemen.  He was made Freeman on 19 May 1642. Sometime soon after becoming Freeman Walter Tybott went to Gloucester with others from The Blynman Party.  He was elected Selectman 1642 – 1645.

His will was proved at Salem Court 5 June 165 and it names his children and grandchildren "item i giue to my dafter mari harskol the wif of william hasskole fifteene pound in good pay. I gieu to josef hasskol son of william my farm at chebake. I guie to william hasskolls other sonnes twenti shelenes a pece to put to som good implement.” He also named his grandchild "Richard Dicke," granddaughter Elizabeth Dike, "son clark" [his daughter Agnes’s second husband] and "Sabelone" [Zebulon] Hill, soon-to-be-husband of granddaughter Elizabeth Dike.

Apparently he had only two daughters, Mary and Agnes.  I descend from Mary Tybott (1628 – 1693) who married William Haskell in Salem, Massachusetts in 1643.  They had nine children all born in Gloucester. Mary died on 16 August 1693 in Gloucester, and William died four days later.

Some TYBOTT resources:

"Henry Tibbetts & some of his Descendants", NEHGS Register, Vol 98, page. 58.  
“The Blynman Party," NEHGS Register, Vol 53, page. 234 - 241.
Ira J. Haskell, Chronicles of the Haskell Family, Ira J. Haskell, 1943.
Plymouth Records, Vol. 2, page 8.

My TYBOTT lineage:

Generation 1: Walter Tybott, born about 1584 in Wales, died 14 August 1651; married Mary UNKNOWN.  She remarried to John Harding on 22 April 1652 in Plymouth.  Mary died 21 February 1681 in Gloucester. Two daughters with Walter Tybott.

Generation 2: Mary Tybott, born 6 November 1628 in Chepstow, Monmouthshire, Wales, died 24 August 1693 in Gloucester; married 6 November 1643 in Salem to William Haskell, son of William Haskell and Elinor Foule.  He was baptized 8 November 1618 in Charlton, Musgrove, Somersetshire, England, and died 20 August 1693 in Gloucester. Nine children.

Generation 3: Mark Haskell m. Elizabeth Giddings
Generation 4:  Mark Haskell m. Martha Tuthill
Generation 5:  Lucy Haskell m. Jabez Treadwell
Generation 6:  Nathaniel Treadwell m. Mary Hovey
Generation 7:  Jabez Treadwell m. Betsey Jillings Homan
Generation 8: Eliza Ann Treadwell m. Abijah Hitchings
Generation 9:  Abijah Franklin Hitchings m. Hannah Eliza Lewis
Generation 10:  Arthur Treadwell Hitchings m. Florence Etta Hoogerzeil
Generation 11: Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “Surname Saturday ~ TYBOTT of Gloucester, Massachusetts”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted July 8, 2017, (http://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/07/surname-saturday-tybott-of-gloucester.html: accessed [access date]).