Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Weathervane Wednesday ~ Above a Bandstand

I post another in a series of weather vane photographs every Wednesday.  This started with images of weathervanes from the Londonderry, New Hampshire area, but now I've found interesting weather vanes all across New England and across the globe.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are interesting.  Often my readers tip me off to some very unique or unusual weathervanes, too!  If you know a great weather vane near you, let me know if you'd like to have it featured on this blog.

Today's weather vane was photographed in New Hampshire.

Do you know the location of weathervane post #333?  Scroll down to find the answer.



This weathervane was photographed in Sunapee, New Hampshire on the Ben Mere bandstand in the small park on the corner of Lake Avenue and Burkhaven Hill Road.  This goose weathervane is very appropriate since it is located one block from Lake Sunapee Harbor.  The bandstand has a great view of the harbor and lake.

There are summer concerts every Wednesday night at this bandstand from 7 to 9pm.   This bandstand is the site of the Ben Mere Inn, which stood here from the 1890s until 1967.   A committee of residents purchased the lot and donated the land to the town as a park.  The bandstand was built in 1987.

Click here for a video of the demolition of the Ben Mere Inn:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M8OHdJjVaHU  


-------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ Above a Bandstand", Nutfield Genealogy, posted October 18, 2017, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/10/weathervane-wednesday-above-bandstand.html: accessed [access date]).

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Tombstone Tuesday ~ My 5th Great Grandfather, Abner Poland (1761 - 1835), Enfield, New Hampshire

This tombstone was photographed at the Oak Grove Cemetery in Enfield, New Hampshire.


GOVE
ABNER POLAND
DIED
Jan. 14, 1835
AE. 74
SARAH,
His Wife died
Nov. 10, 1846
AE. 86




ELIJAH GOVE
DIED
May 29, 1845
AE. 58
EDNOR,
His Wife died
Sept. 26, 1865
AE. 72

Abner Poland, Jr., son of Abner Poland (1736 - 1824) and Dorothy Burnham, was born 17 May 1761 in Essex, Massachusetts, and died 14 January 1835 in Enfield, New Hampshire; married on 20 March 1783 in Essex to Sarah Burnham, daughter of Westley Burnham and Deborah Story.  Abner received bounty land in Enfield as part of his reward for Revolutionary War Service.

Abner and Sarah had eight children:  Sally, Abner, Ruth, Mary, David, Ednor, Thomas Emerson, and Beniah.  Their daughter Ednor Poland (1793 - 1865) married on 11 April 1810 in Ipswich, Massachusetts to Elijah Gove, son of Nathan Gove and Rhoda Prescott.  They lived in the nearby town of Canaan, New Hampshire.  After Abner's death, Sarah went to live with her daughter, Ednor Poland Gove in Canaan.  They are all listed on the GOVE family obelisk in the Oak Grove Cemetery.



The Oak Grove Cemetery is located on the hill behind the Community Lutheran Church on Main Street in Enfield, New Hampshire.

Click here for my POLAND genealogy:
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2015/04/surname-saturday-poland-of-essex-county.html 

Click here for Sarah Poland's will:
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2015/10/sarah-burnham-polands-1845-last-will.html

Click here for a fun blog post about finding Abner Poland's military discharge papers at NARA - signed by George Washington!
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2015/10/sarah-burnham-polands-1845-last-will.html


------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~ My 5th Great Grandfather, Abner Poland (1761 - 1835), Enfield, New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted October 18, 2017, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/10/tombstone-tuesday.html: accessed [access date]).

Monday, October 16, 2017

Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ Stephen Hopkins of Upper Clatford, Hampshire, England

Along the Pilgrim Trail, Part 5

All Saints Church, Upper Clatford, Hampshire, England

Vincent and I recently took the General Society of Mayflower Descendants Historic Sites Tour of England, Wales and The Netherlands along with 41 other enthusiast participants (known as "The 43").  We traced the footsteps of the Separatists and the Mayflower passengers and crew all around these countries with some amazing tour directors, guides, historians and authors.  We were given access to places off the usual tourist trails, and behind the scenes.  We had a wonderful time, and I will be blogging about it over the next few weeks.

On our tour we stopped at many small churches in tiny little English villages. One of the first village churches we toured was All Saints in Upper Clatford, Hampshire, where Stephen Hopkins (1581 – 1644) of the Mayflower was baptized on 30 April 1581.  He was the son of John Hopkins and Elizabeth Williams.  He was minister’s clerk, and worked for the Virginia Company.  He left on board the Sea Venture in 1609 for Jamestown, Virginia, but was shipwrecked in Bermuda.  The castaways rebuilt two new boats and reached Jamestown in 1610.  Sometime later Hopkins returned to London, and found that his wife had died.  He remarried to Elizabeth Fisher and in 1620 boarded the Mayflower with his family for the New World a second time.

A copy of the baptism record of Stephen Hopkins
is on display inside All Saints church

The Stephen Hopkins descendants posed for a group photo
in front of the altar with Jane from All Saints church

This rural church was surrounded by grazing cows and sheep, with a tidy little churchyard full of interesting gravestones.  Even those of us who were not Hopkins descendants were enchanted! The church building was originally erected in the 12th century, and today it looks much like it did when Stephen Hopkins attended services here.

Jane, the church historian who gave us a tour, informed us that PBS had been to the church recently with the author and historian Caleb Johnson to film a documentary about the life of Stephen Hopkins.  I can’t wait!  His life story is like an action adventure movie.

Stay tuned for more coming soon!

Yes, those are cows right next to the church gate!


Views of the picturesque churchyard at Upper Clatford



The Upper Clatford welcome committee!


Part 1 of this series "Babworth, Nottinghamshire":

Part 2 of this series “Scrooby Manor, Nottinghamshire”:

----------------------------------


Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ Stephen Hopkins of Upper Clatford, Hampshire, England”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted October 16, 2017, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/10/along-pilgrim-trail-stephen-hopkins-of.html: accessed [access date]). 

Saturday, October 14, 2017

Surname Saturday ~ HOMAN of Marblehead

Edward Homan Probate 1713, naming his wife as "Richard"

Essex County, MA: Probate File Papers, 1638-1881.Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2014. (From records supplied by the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Archives.)  https://www.americanancestors.org/DB515/i/13767/13732-co5/30230114


HOMAN / HOLMAN / HOLEMAN / HOLMEN / HOLDMAN / HOOMAN / HAMMON / HOEMAN

Two brothers, Gabriel and Edward Homan, settled in Marblehead, Massachusetts in the mid 1600s.  Edward Homan (about 1646 – 1713) is my 9th great grandfather.  He was one of the first fourteen householders in Marblehead before 1660.  He married about 1668 to Richard Brimblecomb, the DAUGHTER of John and Tabitha Brimblecomb of Marblehead.  Her name Richard can be seen in his last will and testament written in 1713.  They had five children born in Marblehead.  The Edward Homan house is still standing in Marblehead at 29 – 31 Circle Street, and is dated about 1670, and the right side of the house was built about 1802 or 1803.

Edward Homan, Jr. (1668 – 1714), my 8th great grandfather, died a year  after his father in Marblehead.  He married Elizabeth Gould in 1692 in Marblehead, and they had six children.  Edward, Jr. was called “a planter” and “a cooper”, and he bought land from Christopher Lattamore in 1680 [Essex Registry of Deeds, book 2, leaf 89].

Peter Homan (b. 1699) was my 7th great grandfather.  He married in 1723 to Mary Hoyle, daughter of Samuel Hoyle and Mary Fortune of Marblehead.  They had seven children.  Their eldest, William Homan (b. 1725), my 6th great grandfather, married about 1758 to Elizabeth and had a son named Thomas (about 1758 – 1832), my 5th great grandfather.  Thomas Homan’s wife, Tabitha Glover, was the niece of Brigadier General John Glover (1732 – 1797) of Revolutionary War fame.   Thomas served in the American Revolutionary War, too, under Capt. Putnam as a private in Massachusetts in 1776 for one year.  He applied for a pension in 1818.

Betsey Jillings Homan (1792 – 1874), my 4th great grandmother, was the last in this line of HOMANs.  She married Jabez Treadwell of Ipswich, and they resided in Salem, where their seven children were born. 

For more about the HOMAN family:

The Holmans in America, by David Emory Holman, 1909, Volume 1

The Edward Homan House, MACRIS (Massachusetts Cultural Resource Information System)  http://mhc-macris.net/Details.aspx?MhcId=MAR.1228 accessed September 7, 2017

My HOLMAN genealogy:

Generation 1:  Edward Homan, born about 1646, died December 1713 in Marblehead; married about 1668 to Richard Brimblecomb, daughter of John Brimblecomb and Tabitha Unknown.  She was born about 1646 probably in Modbury, Devonshire, England, and died December 1719 in Marblehead, Massachusetts.  They had five children.

Generation 2:   Edward Homan born about 1668 in Marblehead, died July 1714 in Marblehead; married on 27 October 1692 in Marblehead to Elizabeth Gould, daughter of Alexander Gould and Margaret Brown.  She was born about 1667 and died after 26 December 1719.  Six children.

Generation 3:   Peter Homan was born 26 June 1699 in Marblehead; married on 12 December 1723 in Marblehead to Mary Hoyle, daughter of Samuel Hoyle and Mary Fortune.  She was baptized on 21 March 1702/3 in Marblehead.  They had seven children.

Generation 4:  William Homan, baptized 25 July 1725 in Marblehead; married to Elizabeth Unknown; at least one child.

Generation 5:  Thomas Homan, born about 1758 and died 20 January 1832 in Marblehead; married on 28 November 1782 in Marblehead to Tabitha Glover, daughter of Daniel Glover and Hannah Jillings.  She was baptized on 10 February 1765 and died 13 March 1837 in Marblehead.  They had seven children.

Generation 6:  Betsey Jilling Homan, baptized on 14 October 1792 in Marblehead, died 6 April 1874 in Salem, Massachusetts; married on 17 November 1811 in Marblehead to Jabez Treadwell, son of Nathaniel Treadwell and Mary Hovey.  He was born 17 October 1788 in Ipswich, and died 4 November 1840 in Salem.  Seven children.

Generation 7:   Eliza Ann Treadwell m. Abijah Hitchings
Generation 8:  Abijah Franklin Hitchings m. Hannah Eliza Lewis
Generation 9:  Arthur Treadwell Hitchings m. Florence Etta Hoogerzeil
Generation 10: Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen (my grandparents)

----------------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “Surname Saturday ~ HOMAN of Marblehead”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted October 14, 2017, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/10/surname-saturday-homan-of-marblehead.html: accessed [access date]). 

Friday, October 13, 2017

Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ Harwich, Essex, England

Along the Pilgrim Trail, Part 4



Vincent and I recently took the General Society of Mayflower Descendants Historic SitesTour of England, Wales and The Netherlands along with 41 other enthusiast participants (known as "The 43").  We traced the footsteps of the Separatists and the Mayflower passengers and crew all around these countries with some amazing tour directors, guides, historians and authors.  We were given access to places off the usual tourist trails, and behind the scenes.  We had a wonderful time, and I will be blogging about it over the next few weeks.

Harwich in Essex, England is an old coastal town on the North Sea.  It was once the home of the Royal Navy Dockyard from 1652 until 1992.  Today the international ferry runs from here to the Hook of Holland (Hoek van Holland).   In our tour, tracing the footsteps of the Pilgrims, we learned that the Captain of the Mayflower, and part owner of the ship, Christopher Jones, Jr. (about 1570 – 1622) was born here.  Harwich is currently the home of the Harwich Mayflower Project (see below).

"The appraisment and valuation of one fortopsail
and one maintopsail one forebunnett and piece of
forsail taken up at sea (by C'psr Jones of Harwich,
 Mr. of the Mayflower of the same place) near Gore end.
Praised by us, John Holborne and James Seger,
mariners, the 14th of January 1610
"
PRO, HCA 12/74
This plaque was on display at the Harwich Mayflower Project
Christopher Jones, Sr. and his wife, Sybil, lived in Harwich, and had a son named Christopher Jones, Jr. about 1570.  The Jones familes, for both generations, lived in a house on Kings Head Street only one block from the waterfront.  Across the street is a pub named “The Alma” which is where Jones’s first wife, Sara Twitt lived.  Christopher Jones and Sara Twitt married on 27 December 1593 at the St. Nicholas Church.  She died in 1603 with no surviving children.  Captain Jones married a second time later in 1603 to Josian, the widow of Richard Gray, at St. Nicholas Church in Harwich.  He had eight children with Josian, and named one of his ships Josian.


Kings Head Street

Captain Christopher Jones House






The Alma Pub across the street from the Jones House

In 1609 Christopher Jones became part owner of the Mayflower.  The Jones family removed to Rotherhithe, London in 1611, where he lived until he died in 1622, shortly after returning from New England. 

I’ll be blogging about Rotherhithe a bit later… stay tuned!

On the waterfront at Harwich is this cute, tiny, free museum
about the Mayflower and Captain Christopher Jones

After touring the waterfront, we were treated to a tour of the Harwich Mayflower Project.  The team at this venture have been endeavoring to build a replica of the Mayflower for the 400th anniversary of the voyage to New England.  They would like to have it finished by 2020 and sail it to Plymouth, Massachusetts.  They have a long way to go on fundraising several million pounds, and to starting to build the ship.


They are assembling the keel of the Mayflower replica

Every penny and pound helps
this effort in Harwich

Part 1 of this series "Babworth, Nottinghamshire":

Part 2 of this series “Scrooby Manor, Nottinghamshire, England”

----------------------------------


Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ Harwich, Essex, England”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted October 13, 2017, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/10/along-pilgrim-trail-harwich-essex.html: accessed [access date]). 

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Please Contribute to the Honor Roll Project for Veteran's Day 2017

WWI Honor Roll at Acworth, New Hampshire
photo by Denise Picard Lindgren

Please join me in the Honor Roll Project.  Volunteers are taking photos of war memorials and honor rolls, posting them on their blogs and websites, and transcribing the names of all the people listed.  These transcriptions make the names available for search engines, and the names will be available for people searching for family, ancestors and friends.

I started this project in 2010 with the photos of the Londonderry Civil War monument, and then followed with the other war monuments on the town common, Derry’s MacGregor Park and other local honor rolls.  Other bloggers and photographers were invited to participate.  We now have contributions from nearly all the United States, and from five other countries.  The email and comments I have read are truly inspiring, and it makes it well worth the effort to transcribe names when you read how family members found their fathers and grandfathers online, or how families searching their family trees find ancestors who served in the Civil War or World War I. 

"I never knew my ancestor was in the Civil War until I Googled his name and found it on your blog! Thanks so much for your project - Charles Chase" 13 Dec 2011

" Thank you! Aina Bernier- daughter of Ernest Albert Bernier, Jr." 27 Jan 2011

If you would like to participate this year, I will be posting a compilation post of all the participating bloggers on Veteran's Day, Saturday, November 11th.  All contributions will be permanently available on the Honor Roll Project website at https://honorrollproject.weebly.com/    Every November for Veteran’s / Armistice Day I publicize this project for more volunteers and contributors, and again in May I publicize the project for Memorial Day . 

To participate, leave me a comment below or an email at vrojomit@gmail.com   All you need to do is photograph a local honor roll or war monument, and transcribe the names.  If you have a blog, post the story, photos and transcriptions and send me the permanent link for the Honor Roll Project.  If you don’t have a blog, I can post the photo and names for you and add it to the Honor Roll Project, giving you full credit for the photography and transcription.  Or contact your favorite genealogy blogger, and they would be happy to post your photo and transcription, too. 

This is a simple way of saying “Thank You” to all the veterans in our communities- past and present. 

The Honor Roll Project Page:  https://honorrollproject.weebly.com/

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Weathervane Wednesday ~ An old Stable

I post another in a series of weather vane photographs every Wednesday.  This started with images of weathervanes from the Londonderry, New Hampshire area, but now I've found interesting weather vanes all across New England and across the globe.  Sometimes my weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are interesting.  Often my readers tip me off to some very unique or unusual weathervanes, too!  If you know a great weather vane near you, let me know if you'd like to have it featured on this blog.

Today's weather vane was photographed in Massachusetts by a reader.


Do you know the location of weathervane post #332?  Scroll down to find the answer.








This weathervane sits on a cupola above the Metropolitan Police Stable building located at 1 Land Boulevard in East Cambridge, Massachusetts.  You might recognize it as the small brick building now located next to the Museum of Science garage.  This 1910 building was originally a stable for police horses, and then used as a garage for police vehicles. The Metropolitan Police used this building until the 1990s, and it is now vacant.  According to the website below it was slated for exterior repairs in 2013. It doesn’t appear that this was completed (or they forgot to fix the weathervane!).

The Metropolitan District Commission Police were formed in 1893 for law enforcement on all MDC properties, including reservoirs, waterways and watersheds, and full jurisdiction throughout Greater Boston.  The MDC police were merged into the Massachusetts State Police in 1992, and no longer exist.


This photograph is dated Aug. 16, 1912
The Museum of Science is now located in the foreground,
where the men are playing a game of baseball.
From https://www.digitalcommonwealth.org/
The Massachusetts Archives Photography website.



Today’s weathervane photograph was sent to me by Rebecca Colbath Carlino.  She took the photo from the Museum of Science garage.

Thanks, Rebecca!

For more information: 

From the State of Massachusetts website (the old stable building):

The History of the MDC Police http://mdcpolicephotos.weebly.com/history.html


-------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ An old Stable", Nutfield Genealogy, posted October 11, 2017, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/10/weathervane-wednesday-old-stable.html: accessed [access date]).

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Tombstone Tuesday ~ An Infant, 1811, Windham, New Hampshire

This tombstone was photographed at the Cemetery on the Plain in Windham, New Hampshire.  This diminutive little stone with its delicate carving of a weeping willow caught my eye for a Tombstone Tuesday photo.


AN
Infant child
of Sam and Mary
Anderson; died
Nov. 11, 1811


-------------------

Transcribed from History of Windham in New Hampshire, by Leonard Allison Morrison, 1884, page 311

"40. Deacon Samuel [Anderson] 26 (John, Samuel, James) was b. March 3, 1781.  He lived upon the homestead in Windham, which is now in possession of Joseph P. Crowell.  His father deeded him 187 acres on Jan. 1, 1808; was made an elder under Rev. Calvin Cutler, in 1833; was selectman in 1821, '22, '25, '26, '35, '38; representative in 1827 and '28.  He was a genial, mild-mannered, and much respected citizen.  He m. Dec. 25, 1810, Mary Wilson, wo d. Aug. 29, 1843; ae. 58 yrs.; he m. 2nd Feb. 27, 1849 Elizabeth Armstrong, who d. Nov. 23, 1878, ae. 89 yrs. 5 mos.  He d. Jan. 5, 1864. Children, born in Windham: -

43 Infant son b. Nov. 11, 1811; d. young."


--------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~ An Infant, 1811, Windham, New Hampshire", Nutfield Genealogy, posted October 10, 2017, (https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/10/tombstone-tuesday-infant-1811-windham.html: accessed [access date]).