Monday, December 18, 2017

Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ The Mayflower returns to Rotherhithe, London, England

Along the Pilgrim Trail, Part 23

The Mayflower Pub, Rotherhithe, London
and 43 members of the Mayflower Society Tour

Vincent and I recently took the General Society of Mayflower Descendants Historic Sites Tour of England, Wales and The Netherlands along with 41 other enthusiast participants (known as "The 43").  We traced the footsteps of the Separatists and the Mayflower passengers and crew all around these countries with some amazing tour directors, guides, historians and authors.  We were given access to places off the usual tourist trails, and behind the scenes.  We had a wonderful time, and this is the last blog post of this series.

Since October I have been blogging about our tour to England and Holland with the General Society of Mayflower Descendants.  For 22 posts I have traced the footsteps of our Pilgrim ancestors from the origins of the Separatists in Babsworth and Gainsborough, to the home villages and parishes of the Pilgrim Fathers and Mothers, to their escape to Holland, and back again to England before finally departing Plymouth in Devonshire in 1620.  Many readers never knew all these stories, and it has been interesting to relive the adventures of these early colonists before they even came to the New World.

In the 22nd post the Separatists and the adventurers left Plymouth.  Most of you know what happened next when they crossed the stormy Atlantic Ocean for 66 days, landed at Cape Cod, searched for a place to plant their colony, and endured a terrible winter when 50 of the 102 settlers died.  However, by springtime they had made alliances with the Native Wampanoag people, planted their first crops, and were on their way to surviving in New England.

On 5 April 1621 Captain Christopher Jones and his crew returned to England.  None of the colonists decided to return with him, although he offered to bring anyone who wanted to return.  They returned to London in 31 days, less than half the time it took to get to Cape Cod. 

Less than a year later, Captain Jones died in Rotherhithe, a neighborhood along the Thames River in London.  This was where the Mayflower landed on her return.  Jones’s widow and the other three owners of the Mayflower (Jones was the fourth owner) applied for an appraisal of the ship in 1622. It appraised for 128 pounds, 8 shillings, and 4 pence.  The ship was then probably scrapped.

Rotherhithe is a place where you can see many memorials to Capt. Christopher Jones, and to the Mayflower.  My two favorite memorials are the statue called “Sunbeam Weekly and the Pilgrim’s Pocket,” and the Mayflower Inn.  The Mayflower Pub, where descendants are invited to sign a book and list their Mayflower ancestors.  The Mayflower originally sailed from near this pub, which was originally called “The Shippe”, and then rebuilt in the 18th century and renamed “The Spread Eagle”, and then renamed “The Crown”. We also visited St. Mary’s Church, where Capt. Jones is buried, and there is a plaque commemorating the Mayflower.

This is the last of the blog posts, because this is where the Mayflower came to rest, and was eventually scrapped.  The story doesn’t end here, because the colonists that Capt. Christopher Jones left behind prospered, and were eventually joined with their beloved kinfolk and friends from Leiden when the ships Fortune and James arrived in the subsequent years.

You know the rest of the story!

Sunbeam Weekly and the Pilgrim's Pocket
This statue is named for a popular series of children's historic comic books.
The little boy is reading about the history of America,
and a Pilgrim is looking over his shoulder. 
The Pilgrim's pocket includes a lobster, a guide to London, and a cross.  


St. Mary's Church, Rotherhithe, where Capt. Christopher Jones is buried


This is Yours Truly, signing the book for descendants at the Mayflower Pub in Rotherhithe.
We all had a nice lunch, and all signed the book.  This was one of the highlights of the entire trip for me!







The Mayflower Pub in Rotherhithe website:  http://www.mayflowerpub.co.uk/


Other blog posts in this series:
  
Part 1 of this series "Babworth, Nottinghamshire":

Part 2 of this series "Scrooby Manor"

Part 3 of this series “Gainsborough, Lincolnshire”:

Part 4 of this series "Harwich, Essex, home of the Mayflower"

Part 5 this series "Stephen Hopkins of Upper Clatford, Hampshire"

Part 6 of this series "William Mullins of Dorking, Surrey"

Part 7 of this series “Edward Winslow of Droitwich, Worcestershire”

Part 8 of this series "The Fullers of Reddenhall, Norfolk":

Part 9 of this series "John Howland of Fenstanton, Cambridgeshire":

Part 10 of this series "Tilley and Sampson of Henlow, Bedfordshire":

Part 11 of this series "William Bradford of Austerfield, Yorkshire":

Part 12 of this series "Francis Eaton of Bristol":

Part 13 of this series "James Chilton, Robert Cushman of Canterbury, Kent, England":

Part 14 of this series "Fishtoft, Lincolnshire where the Pilgrims were betrayed":

Part 15 of this series "Boston, Lincolnshire, where the Pilgrims were jailed":

Part 16 of this series "Immingham, Lincolnshire to Holland":

Part 17 of this series “In Exile in Amsterdam”:

Part 18 of this series “St. Pieterskerk in Leiden, The Netherlands”:

Part 19 of this series "Touring Leiden":

Part 20 of this series "Delfshaven, Holland"

Part 21 of this series “Dartmouth, Devonshire”

Part 22 of this series “Plymouth, Devonshire”


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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ The Mayflower returns to Rotherhithe, London, England”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted December 18, 2017, (  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/12/along-pilgrim-trail-mayflower-returns.html: accessed [access date]). 




Saturday, December 16, 2017

Surname Saturday ~ BULLY of Saco, Maine

Saco, Maine

BULLY / BAILEY

Nicolas Bully, my 11th great grandfather,  was a fisherman and early settler at Saco, which is now the town of Biddeford Pool, Maine.   He bought a house from the magistrate, Mr. Smith, on 27 June 1650, and Smith rented a room from Bully for the next two years. 

Nicolas Bully, Jr., my 10th great grandfather, was also a fisherman.  He married Ellen Booth, the daughter of Robert Booth.  He was elected constable of Saco in 1664, but died the same year.  Ellen remarried to John Henderson.   The daughter of Nicholas Bully and Ellen Booth, Abigail Bully, married Peter Henderson, the brother or close kin of John Henderson. 

Abigail (Bully) Henderson is my 9th great grandmother.  When several nearby settlements in Maine were attacked by the Native people of the region around 1677 the Hendersons and other families of Saco fled to Massachusetts.  They went to Salem, where they settled as mariners and Peter Henderson was a master mariner.  See my HENDERSON Surname Saturday blog post at this link:


My BULLY genealogy:

Generation 1:  Nicholas Bully, born about 1610, died before 1 November 1678 in Saco (now Biddeford Pool, Maine); married to Unknown.  Six children born in Saco.

Generation 2:  Nicholas Bully, born about 1632, died 29 April 1664 in Saco; married to Eleanor or Ellen Booth, daughter of Robert Booth and Deborah Unknown.  She was born February 1634 probably in England, and died after 1701 in Salem, Massachusetts

Generation 3:  Abigail Bully, born 1 February 1655 in Saco; married on 29 December 1670 in Saco to Peter Henderson.  He was born about 1649 and died after 27 September 1700 in Salem.  Five children.

Generation 4:  Abigail Henderson m. Jonathan Glover
Generation 5:  Jonathan Glover m. Tabitha Bacon
Generation 6: Daniel Glover m. Hannah Jillings
Generation 7: Tabitha Glover m. Thomas Homan
Generation 8: Betsey Jillings Glover m. Jabez Treadwell
Generation 9:  Eliza Ann Treadwell m. Abijah Hitchings
Generation 10:  Abijah Franklin Hitchings m. Hannah Eliza Lewis
Generation 11:   Arthur Treadwell Hitchings m. Florence Etta Hoogerzeil
Generation 12: Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer Allen (my grandparents)

----------------------------
Heather Wilkinson Rojo, “Surname Saturday ~ BULLY of Saco, Maine”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted December 16, 2017, (  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/12/surname-saturday-bully-of-saco-maine.html: accessed [access date]). 

Friday, December 15, 2017

Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ The Mayflower leaves Plymouth, England

Along the Pilgrim Trail, Part 22


The Plymouth Steps, where the Mayflower left England for the New World

Vincent and I recently took the General Society of Mayflower Descendants Historic Sites Tour of England, Wales and The Netherlands along with 41 other enthusiast participants (known as "The 43").  We traced the footsteps of the Separatists and the Mayflower passengers and crew all around these countries with some amazing tour directors, guides, historians and authors.  We were given access to places off the usual tourist trails, and behind the scenes.  We had a wonderful time, and there will be only one more blog post for this series.

Like the Pilgrims, after our stop in Dartmouth, we stopped in Plymouth.  It was a rainy, windy day and I wondered if perhaps the Pilgrims had the same weather.  Bradford forgot to note the weather in his famous journal.  Perhaps in 1620 Plymouth was a small town, but today it is a very large city in Devonshire.  It is a large naval base, with a fortified wall and dockyard.  Like nearby Dartmouth, it was an embarkation point for D-Day. 

The area where the Mayflower embarked for the New World is called the Barbican, and the memorial on the waterfront is called “The Mayflower Steps”.  The city of Plymouth is planning to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the sailing of the Mayflower in 2020 with much urban development and waterfront improvements. It is a huge tourist destination for beaches and sailing. 

On the Barbican are many Pilgrim related sites to see including the Mayflower Steps, the Mayflower Museum, and The Black Friars Gin Distillery where it is believed some of the Pilgrims and passengers dined before leaving Plymouth.  There were many other shops and buildings along the Barbican, like the Pilgrim Ice Cream shop with a list of Mayflower passengers posted on the outside wall! 

There were many plaques near the Mayflower Steps for the Mayflower, and also for several other historic sailings.  It was interesting to learn that the ships that sailed for the Roanoke Colony in Virginia left from this spot on 27 April 1584.  Also, the Sea Venture left from this spot in Plymouth in 1609, carrying passengers to Jamestown, including the future Mayflower passenger Stephen Hopkins.  The Sea Venture shipwrecked at Bermuda, but Hopkins eventually made it to Jamestown, and then back to England again.  There was also a plaque commemorating the transport ships Friendship and Charlotte, which left here in 1787 with convicts bound for Australia.  They landed with nine other ships at what is now Sydney, New South Wales, making these ships the equivalent to our Mayflower.  

The Pilgrim Steps Memorial in the rain

"Now all being compact together
in one ship they put to sea again
with a prosperous wind..."
This railing at the Mayflower Steps quotes Bradford's journal
and continues with "... As one small candle may light a thousand,
so the light here kindled hath shone unto many, yea in some sort to our whole nation...
Being thus arrived in a good harbor and brought safe to land, they fell upon their
knees and blessed the God in heaven."

The Mayflower Museum is just across the street
from the the Mayflower Steps
The Mayflower Museum has two floors of
exhibit space and a first floor gift shop.


Pilgrim Ice Cream shop

The passenger list on the outside wall

After leaving the Speedwell at Plymouth, and boarding 102 passengers for the New World, the Mayflower left Plymouth harbor on 6 September 1620.  She made her crossing in 66 days and arrived at Cape Cod on 11 November.   And you know the rest of the story!

Stay tuned for my last blog post, which is about the return of the Mayflower to Rotherhithe, London, England in 1621.


Mayflower400 UK   http://www.mayflower400uk.org/  


Other blog posts in this series:
  
Part 1 of this series "Babworth, Nottinghamshire":

Part 2 of this series "Scrooby Manor"

Part 3 of this series “Gainsborough, Lincolnshire”:

Part 4 of this series "Harwich, Essex, home of the Mayflower"

Part 5 this series "Stephen Hopkins of Upper Clatford, Hampshire"

Part 6 of this series "William Mullins of Dorking, Surrey"

Part 7 of this series “Edward Winslow of Droitwich, Worcestershire”

Part 8 of this series "The Fullers of Reddenhall, Norfolk":

Part 9 of this series "John Howland of Fenstanton, Cambridgeshire":

Part 10 of this series "Tilley and Sampson of Henlow, Bedfordshire":

Part 11 of this series "William Bradford of Austerfield, Yorkshire":

Part 12 of this series "Francis Eaton of Bristol":

Part 13 of this series "James Chilton, Robert Cushman of Canterbury, Kent, England":

Part 14 of this series "Fishtoft, Lincolnshire where the Pilgrims were betrayed":

Part 15 of this series "Boston, Lincolnshire, where the Pilgrims were jailed":

Part 16 of this series "Immingham, Lincolnshire to Holland":

Part 17 of this series “In Exile in Amsterdam”:

Part 18 of this series “St. Pieterskerk in Leiden, The Netherlands”:

Part 19 of this series "Touring Leiden":

Part 20 of this series "Delfshaven, Holland"

Part 21 of this series “Dartmouth, Devonshire”


----------------------------------


Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ The Mayflower leaves Plymouth, England”, Nutfield Genealogy, posted December 15, 2017, (  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/12/along-pilgrim-trail-mayflower-leaves.html:  accessed [access date]). 

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Weathervane Wednesday ~ A Winged Horse in London

Weathervane Wednesday is an on-going series of photographs I post weekly.  I started out by publishing only weather vanes from the Londonderry area, but now I've been finding interesting weather vanes from all over New England.  Sometimes these weather vanes are whimsical, or historical, but all are very unique.  Often, my readers tip me off to some very special and unusual weather vanes.

Today's weather vane is from somewhere in London, England.

Do you know the location of weather vane #341?  Scroll down to see the answer...




This gilded Pegasus weather vane was photographed at the Inner Temple in London, England.  We were there to visit the Temple Church (see this blog post about the Templar Knight William Marshal, my 23rd great grandfather), when we spotted this pretty weather vane.  The Pegasus is the symbol of the Inner Temple since the sixteenth century.  The building you see here is No. 2 Crown Office Row inside the Inner Temple.   The Inner Temple is one of the four Inns of Court, the professional legal associations in England.

The College of Arms granted the Inner Temple the right to use the silver Pegasus on a blue background (Azure a Pegasus salient argent) for its crest in 1967. 


An explanation of the Pegasus symbol for the Inner Court:
https://www.innertemplelibrary.org.uk/inner-temple/history/pegasus/ 


Click here to see all the previous Weathervane Wednesday posts!

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Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Weathervane Wednesday ~ A Winged Horse in London", Nutfield Genealogy, posted December 13, 2017, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/12/weathervane-wednesday-winged-horse-in.html: accessed [access date]). 

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Brother to a famous Playwright

This tombstone was photographed at the Southwark Cathedral in London, England


EDMOND
SHAKESPEARE
DIED DECEMBER
1607

Early in his career at the nearby Globe Theater, William Shakespeare was a parishoner of the Southwark Cathedral in London, England.  The original Globe Theater was very close to the cathedral, and the new reconstruction which opened in 1997 is a bit further away.   In the 1600s there were many theaters in this area. 

Edmund Shakespear (1580 - 1607) was William's younger brother.  He was an actor.  He died young, and William paid the funeral cost of 20 shillings, and for the tombstone which is in the choir.  It is next to the Shakespeare stained glass window and effigy.  According to the cathedral website "The service took place in the morning 'with a forenoon knell of the great bell' and young Edmunc was buried in the church.  His morning funeral allowed his theatrical colleagues the chance to perform in the evening."

Once a year William Shakespeare's birthday is celebrated in the cathedral.   This is the link to the cathedral website:  http://cathedral.southwark.anglican.org/ 



A TRIBUTE FROM ENGLISH AND AMERICAN ADMIRERS OF THE POET WHOSE WORK AND
GLORY ARE THEIR COMMON HERITAGE
THE WINDOW ABOVE A GIFT OF SIR FREDERICK WIGAN, THE INSCRIPTION TO THE GLORY OF
GOD IN GRATITUDE FOR HIS GOOD GIFT TO MEN IN THE GENIUS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE.




------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Tombstone Tuesday ~ Brother to a famous Playwright", Nutfield Genealogy, posted December 12, 2017, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/12/tombstone-tuesday-brother-to-famous.html: accessed [access date]). 

Monday, December 11, 2017

Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ The Speedwell is Repaired at Dartmouth, while the Mayflower Waits

Mayflower and Speedwell in Dartmouth Harbor, by Leslie Wilcox, at Pilgrim Hall Museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts

Along the Pilgrim Trail, Part 21

In my last blog post some of the Pilgrims stayed in Leiden, Holland with their leader, Reverend John Robinson, while a small group of them left Delfshaven on 22 July 1620 aboard the Speedwell to join the Mayflower in Southampton.  Both ships were headed to Virginia in the New World.

The Separatists from Leiden joined other English Separatists in Southampton, along with other colonists arranged by the investors of the expedition.  Since the Speedwell was leaking, they spent two weeks in Southampton for repairs before both ships setting out to sea again on 5 August 1620.

Soon after leaving Southampton, the Speedwell developed more leaks again, so the two ships headed into port at Dartmouth.  They anchored at Bayard’s Cove for repairs.  When they finally set out to sea again, they got no further than Land’s End when the Speedwell again began to leak.  Both ships quickly returned, and it was decided to abandon the Speedwell.  Eleven passengers from the Speedwell boarded the Mayflower, and other 20 Speedwell passengers went home to London while the investors searched for a new vessel.  The Mayflower with 102 passengers headed to Plymouth, Devonshire before leaving for the New World.  The Speedwell’s replacement was the Fortune, which didn’t reach New England until 9 November 1621.

Dartmouth Harbor

DARTMOUTH, DEVON, ENGLAND
Here, off Bayard's Cove, the Mayflower (180 tons) with London colonists,
and the Speedwell (60 tons) with Leyden Pilgrims - some 122 in all -
lay at anchor from August 23 (New Style) to about August 31, 1620.
These ships had sailed from Southampton on August 15.  They put in at Dartmouth
to repair the leaking Speedwell.  They sailed from Dartmouth for America.

When about 300 miles W. S. W. of Land's End, the unseaworthiness of the
Speedwell made it necessary to put back to Plymouth, Devon, on Sep-
tember 7.  The Speedwell was abandoned and on September 18 the Mayflower
alone set sail again for America with 102 passengers.  Their spiritual
leader was Elder William Brewster.  The Mayflower cast anchor in Cape
Cod harbor, New England, on November 21, 1620 off what is now Province-
town, arriving at Plymouth on December 26.

On November 21 the Mayflower Compact, a charter of self-government
--"The First American Constitution" -- was made law by 41 signatories.  Thus
Dartmouth took part in establishing civil and religious liberty
in the New World.

The General Society of Mayflower Descendants (U.S.A. 1897)
Waldo Morgan Allen, Governor General

On their first Pilgrimage - 152 by planes - to the Netherlands and England
September 22 - October 6, 1955.  Dartmouth, October 2..
335 years after the sailing of the Mayflower



Our tour spent a lovely day at Dartmouth.  It is a tourist destination on the mouth of the Dart River in Devonshire.   There is a lovely castle at the mouth of the river, and small fortified tower next to Bayard’s Cove.  You can see these forts in photos of Dartmouth, and in many paintings of the Speedwell at port in Dartmouth (see the top of this blog post).  Bayard’s Cove has several historic plaques and signs about the Speedwell and the Pilgrim Fathers.



Three hungry Pilgrims eating lunch at the Bayard's Cove Inn
Yours Truly, Vincent and Barbara William, the Historic Sites Tour director

Next to Bayard’s Cove was a picturesque little inn built in 1390.  I knew that this building was standing while our ancestors were waiting for repairs to be made to the Speedwell in 1620, so we stopped there for a quick sandwich during our tour.  It was warm and cozy inside, and a perfect spot to soak in the historic atmosphere.  There is also a historic museum a few blocks away, with information on Dartmouth and displays about the Speedwell and the Mayflower.  During World War II Dartmouth was a departure point for the D Day Landings in Normandy, and information on this era is also on display in the museum and commemorated at a waterfront park. The town of Dartmouth was one of my favorite stops on our trip to England.  Perhaps the Pilgrims enjoyed their stay here as much as I did!




The Dartmouth Museum (see the link below)


In my next blog post I will describe Plymouth, Devonshire, where the Mayflower finally departed for the New World on 6 September 1620, very late in the year for crossing the Atlantic Ocean.


Bayard’s Cove Inn   https://www.bayardscoveinn.co.uk/
Dartmouth Museum  http://www.dartmouthmuseum.org/

Other blog posts in this series:


Part 1 of this series "Babworth, Nottinghamshire":

Part 2 of this series "Scrooby Manor"

Part 3 of this series “Gainsborough, Lincolnshire”:

Part 4 of this series "Harwich, Essex, home of the Mayflower"

Part 5 this series "Stephen Hopkins of Upper Clatford, Hampshire"

Part 6 of this series "William Mullins of Dorking, Surrey"

Part 7 of this series “Edward Winslow of Droitwich, Worcestershire”

Part 8 of this series "The Fullers of Reddenhall, Norfolk":

Part 9 of this series "John Howland of Fenstanton, Cambridgeshire":

Part 10 of this series "Tilley and Sampson of Henlow, Bedfordshire":

Part 11 of this series "William Bradford of Austerfield, Yorkshire":

Part 12 of this series "Francis Eaton of Bristol":

Part 13 of this series "James Chilton, Robert Cushman of Canterbury, Kent, England":

Part 14 of this series "Fishtoft, Lincolnshire where the Pilgrims were betrayed":

Part 15 of this series "Boston, Lincolnshire, where the Pilgrims were jailed":

Part 16 of this series "Immingham, Lincolnshire to Holland":

Part 17 of this series “In Exile in Amsterdam”:

Part 18 of this series “St. Pieterskerk in Leiden, The Netherlands”:

Part 19 of this series "Touring Leiden":
Part 20 of this series "Delfshaven, Holland"
https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/12/along-pilgrim-trail-speedwell-leaves.html 



-------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Along the Pilgrim Trail ~  The Speedwell is Repaired at Dartmouth, while the Mayflower Waits", Nutfield Genealogy, posted December 11, 2017, (  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/12/along-pilgrim-trail-speedwell-is.html: accessed [access date]). 

Saturday, December 9, 2017

Surname Saturday ~ HENDERSON of Saco, Maine and Salem, Massachusetts


HENDERSON

In the late 1600s the early Maine settlers were in conflict with the Native people of the seacoast, and there were many massacres that killed people on both sides.  Large numbers of settlements were completely abandoned.  Many of these settlers fled to Salem and Marblehead, Massachusetts.  Some historians believe that the traumas experienced by many of these people, especially the children, may have led to the witch hysteria.

Peter Henderson (about 1649 – after 1700), my 9th great grandfather, was a fisherman from Saco, Maine. He married his probable brother’s step-daughter, Abigail Bully in 1670 in Saco (now Biddeford Poole, Maine).  The John Henderson who married Ellen Booth, the widow of Nicholas Bully is considered to be his brother or close kin.   In 1671 Peter was granted 12 acres of land next to John’s property.

Peter first appeared in the Salem records around 1677, after the first massacres in Maine.  In Salem Peter Henderson was known as a Master Mariner and “Fisher Captain”.  In 1683 he paid taxes in Salem and appeared in a lawsuit against Robert Bray, Sr., and Richard Bale “for abusive carriages on board to the master. Bale was fined and ordered to be whipped.”   Also in 1683 Peter Henderson’s ship “ketch, Sara, was chased ashore by pirates at Funchal [Madeira].  There was another incident with pirates in 1697 concerning Henderson’s ketch, Margaret.

Two of Peter’s sons, Peter and Benjamin, married two Beadle sisters, Elizabeth and Abigail.  See my BEADLE genealogy at this link:   https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/05/surname-saturday-beadle-of-salem.html   I descend from the daughter, Abigail Henderson (1676 – 1737), my 8th great grandmother, who married Jonathan Glover in 1699.  Abigail and Jonathan Glover were the grandparents of Major General John Glover (1732 – 1797) of Marblehead, the Revolutionary War hero.  Click this link for my GLOVER genealogy:  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/09/surname-saturday-glover-of-salem-and.html

Some HENDERSON resources:

History of Saco and Biddeford, by George Folsom, 1830

Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire, by Sybil Noyes, Charles Thornton Libby and Walter Goodwin Davis, 1928-1939

“The Henderson Family of Salem” by G. Andrews Moriarty, Jr., Essex Institute Historical Collections, Volume 48 (1912), page 328. 


My HENDERSON genealogy: 

Generation 1:  Peter Henderson, born about 1649, died after 27 September 1700 in Salem, Massachusetts; married on 29 December 1670 in Salem to Abigail Bully, daughter of Nicholas Bully and Eleanor Booth.  She was born 1 February 1655 in Saco, Maine.  Five children.

Generation 2:  Abigail Henderson, born October 1676 in Salem, died 29 April 1737 in Salem; married on 31 March 1699 in Salem to Jonathan Glover, son of John Glover and Mary Guppy. He was born 13 April 1677 in Salem and died March 1736.  Six children

Generation 3: Jonathan Glover m. Tabitha Bacon
Generation 4: Daniel Glover m. Hannah Jillings.
Generation 5: Tabitha Glover m. Thomas Homan
Generation 6: Betsey Jillings Homan m. Jabez TREAdwell
Generation 7:  Eliza Ann Treadwell m. Abijah Hitchings
Generation 8:  Abijah Franklin Hithcings m. Hannah Eliza Lewis
Generation 9:  Gertrude Maria
Generation 10:  Gertrude Matilda Hitchings m. Stanley Elmer

---------------------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Surname Saturday ~ HENDERSON of Saco, Maine and Salem, Massachusetts", Nutfield Genealogy, posted December 9, 2017, ( https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/12/surname-saturday-henderson-of-saco.html: accessed [access date]). 

Friday, December 8, 2017

Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ The Speedwell leaves the port of Delfshaven to join The Mayflower

Along the Pilgrim Trail, Part 20


Delfshaven, where the Pilgrim Fathers left Holland for the New World

After a year in Amsterdam, and eleven years in Leiden, the exiled Separatists decided to move to the New World.  In the Netherlands they were facing an imminent war with Spain, and they did not approve of the liberal Dutch culture.  They made an agreement with Merchant Adventurers in London to finance their voyage.  The Separatists traveled by boat from Leiden to Delfshaven where they gathered with friends and family to say goodbye before boarding the Speedwell on 22 July 1620.  They joined the Mayflower in Southampton and started out to cross the Atlantic for Virginia.

When the Leiden congregation was in Delfshaven, they gathered at the Old Church.  This building was built in 1417 as St. Anthony Chapel, Anthoniuskapel, but after the Reformation it was a protestant church, Hervormde Gemeente Delfshaven.  Today it is known as the Pilgrim Fathers Church.  There are many displays and objects in the museum inside.

Pilgrim Fathers Church


"In 1608, a hundred English Puritans fled to the tolerant Netherlands to practice their strict religion.  They were welcomed in Leiden, where after nearly twelve years they decided to emigrate to the New World.  On July 22, 1620, "The Pilgrim Fathers" prayed together on the quays of Delfshaven for the last time, before half of them boarded the Speedwell for the New World.  But the Speedwell proved to be unseaworthy.  Only the Mayflower, the ship that joined the emigration in England, was capable of the journey.  After months of hardship and many deaths, they founded their colony in Plymouth, Massachusetts, where they managed to survive with the help of the Native Americans.  William Bradford was the leader of the colony for a good thirty years and decided to celebrate their first harvest with the Native American people.  This tradition is still celebrated as the holiday known as Thanksgiving."





A stained glass window inside the church
commemorating The Speedwell ship




What happened after the Separatists left Holland and joined the Merchant Adventurers' ship the Mayflower at Southampton? Stay tuned to this blog for the next post.


The Pilgrim Fathers Church, Delfshaven website (in English):
http://www.oudeofpelgrimvaderskerk.nl/en/   

--------------------------


Part 1 of this series "Babworth, Nottinghamshire":

Part 2 of this series "Scrooby Manor"

Part 3 of this series “Gainsborough, Lincolnshire”:

Part 4 of this series "Harwich, Essex, home of the Mayflower"

Part 5 this series "Stephen Hopkins of Upper Clatford, Hampshire"

Part 6 of this series "William Mullins of Dorking, Surrey"

Part 7 of this series “Edward Winslow of Droitwich, Worcestershire”

Part 8 of this series "The Fullers of Reddenhall, Norfolk":

Part 9 of this series "John Howland of Fenstanton, Cambridgeshire":

Part 10 of this series "Tilley and Sampson of Henlow, Bedfordshire":

Part 11 of this series "William Bradford of Austerfield, Yorkshire":

Part 12 of this series "Francis Eaton of Bristol":

Part 13 of this series "James Chilton, Robert Cushman of Canterbury, Kent, England":

Part 14 of this series "Fishtoft, Lincolnshire where the Pilgrims were betrayed":

Part 15 of this series "Boston, Lincolnshire, where the Pilgrims were jailed":

Part 16 of this series "Immingham, Lincolnshire to Holland":

Part 17 of this series “In Exile in Amsterdam”:

Part 18 of this series “St. Pieterskerk in Leiden, The Netherlands”:

Part 19 of this series "Touring Leiden":


---------------------------

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, "Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ The Speedwell leaves the port of Delfshaven to join The Mayflower", Nutfield Genealogy, posted December 8, 2017, (  https://nutfieldgenealogy.blogspot.com/2017/12/along-pilgrim-trail-speedwell-leaves.html: accessed [access date]).